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Project 2: Integrated care for patients with chronic health problems and depression/anxiety

People with long-term conditions (LTCs), such as diabetes and coronary heart disease, are twice as likely as other adults to suffer from depression and/or anxiety disorders. With growing numbers of our population suffering with one or more LTCs, it is imperative that services are able to offer effective, adapted treatments to this patient group.

Over the past few years, a number of innovative treatment protocols have been disseminated across the Oxford AHSN region. These include:

In addition, service innovations have been disseminated which are aimed at supporting other health professionals to offer a more holistic and integrated approach to their patients/students, including:

A modular teaching programme aimed at supporting primary care health professionals, such as GPs, in detecting and managing patients with mental health problems.

A modular training programme for teachers and primary care staff aimed at supporing them to detect and better manage children and young people’s mental health problems.

All IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) services in the Thames Valley have been awarded funding to become ‘early implementer’ sites as part of the national Integrated IAPT Expansion programme to set up new, integrated and co-located services for people suffering with LTCs and co-morbid anxiety/depression. Read more here in the Oxford AHSN newsletter, November 2016.

The network is also actively supporting the implementation of these additional services as well as data collection, design and analysis for a region-wide healthcare utilisation evaluation.

In partnership with David Stuckler, Professor of Political Economy and Sociology, University of Oxford, and the CSUrRegular, two weekly project meetings take place to ensure consistency of healthcare utilisation data collection across the region.

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