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Active clinical innovation adoption projects

Improving detection and management of atrial fibrillation (AF) in primary care

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) and is a major cause of stroke. This project aims to support GPs and commissioners across the region to drive though improvements in the detection and management of AF, leading to a reduction in AF-related stroke.

  • Find out about our ‘Excellence in AF’ anticoagulation work with Bayer and NHS partners in Buckinghamshire here > (updated March 2017)
  • See more on our AF workstreams in this chart

For more information on this project please contact hannah.oatley@oxfordahsn.org

Promoting best practice throughout the heart failure pathway

This project aims to improve the quality of care for patients with heart failure. This includes supporting the implementation of an ambulatory model of care for patients requiring intravenous Furosemide and promoting best practice through the whole heart failure pathway, from diagnosis to end-of-life care.

Update: November 2016 – Natriuretic peptide point of care testing pilot – read more here >

For more information on this project please contact hannah.oatley@oxfordahsn.org

Using intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) sleeve stockings to reduce DVT risk in stroke care

IPC sleeves are inflatable stockings worn on the legs which have been shown to reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism and death among patients who are immobile following a stroke. Read more in this case study.

For more information on this project please contact hannah.oatley@oxfordahsn.org

6000 pregnant women could benefit from remote diabetes monitoringRemote blood glucose monitoring for women who develop diabetes during pregnancy

Increasing numbers of women need clinical monitoring for gestational diabetes, a condition that affects women in pregnancy. This project aims to improve monitoring and management of pregnant women with diabetes using telehealth, which incorporates real-time management of blood glucose control and communication with the patient.

Update: March 2017 – read more here >

For more information on this project please contact lauren.davis@oxfordahsn.org

Integrated fracture prevention service for fragile older people

This project aims to improve the quality of life of people with osteoporosis by optimising the prevention of secondary osteoporotic fragility fracture for example by implementing a fracture liaison service. The project is currently in its second phase.

For more information on this project please contact alison.gowdy@oxfordahsn.org

Spreading best practice in treatment of early inflammatory arthritis

This project aims to improve outcomes in patients with early inflammatory arthritis. A number of workstreams are currently underway in this project which aims to reduce the time required to refer, assess and treat patients with the disease.

For more information on this project please contact james.rose@oxfordahsn.org

Introduction of biosimilars

The Oxford AHSN Clinical Innovation Adoption (CIA) team, working closely with the Oxford AHSN Best Care Medicines Optimisation Clinical Network, is developing shared resources and tools to help regional partners take advantage of the financial savings likely to arise from the introduction of biosimilars to the marketplace. In particular, the introduction of low-cost biosimilar medicines in inflammatory disease (rheumatology, dermatology and gastroenterology) has the potential to offer significant savings to regional providers.

For more information on this project please contact james.rose@oxfordahsn.org

Use of intra-operative fluid management technologies to improve post-op recovery

This project focuses on the use of intra-operative fluid management (IOFM) technologies to improve post-operative outcomes for patients and reduce length of hospital stay. The project is currently in its second phase addressing the recommendations made in the first phase of the project. The Phase 1 Benchmarking Project Report shone light on a number of barriers to clinical adoption and was referenced in the NICE review of Medical Technology Guidance 3 (MTG3) – see ‘Review proposal paper’.

For more information on this project please contact james.rose@oxfordahsn.org

Analysis of Nalmefene to reduce alcohol consumption in people with alcohol dependence

The Oxford AHSN has worked with the Innovation Agency (the AHSN for the North West Coast) in supporting the NICE Implementation Collaborative to understand the key issues surrounding the implementation of NICE TA 325 which recommends nalmefene as an option for reducing alcohol consumption in people with alcohol dependence when offered with ongoing psychosocial support. A final report based on this work was published in March 2017. Read it here.

For more information on this project please contact james.rose@oxfordahsn.org

Spreading best practice to reduce catheter acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI)

The project aims to reduce frequency of catheter acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTI) by promoting best practice, standardising procedures, improving training and increasing the use of portable bladder scanners. The project is currently in its second phase. Read more here.

For more information on this project please contact hannah.oatley@oxfordahsn.org

Eating disorders online recovery support

Support Hope and Recovery Online (SHaRON) is a safe and highly secure social networking system that supports patients with eating disorders. It is an online environment that is moderated by experienced clinicians and ex-service users who want to support others using their experiences of what worked for them in their own recovery. This system has significantly reduced the re-referral rate enabling the service to manage increasing demand.

For more information on this project please contact tracey.marriott@oxfordahsn.org

Supporting best practice in falls prevention

The project will support acute, mental health and community hospitals across the region to implement the Royal College of Physicians’ FallSafe care bundles. The FallSafe bundles have been proven to reduce the rate of falls by 25%. Quality improvement methodologies will be used to ensure that the bundles are fully incorporated into pathways and that the elements are sustainable and consistent in practice.

For more information on this project please contact lauren.davis@oxfordahsn.org

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